FAQs

What’s it going to cost? Do you have a day rate?

A project fee business model works best for our clients and our studio, so we carefully build our estimates for projects based on the information we receive at the project’s inception. Our prices are fair and competitive and we are sensitive to the budgets in different markets and will adjust accordingly if possible.

How many revisions are included in your estimate?

Our standard approach is up to two rounds of low resolution comp revisions and one round of high res revisions, if needed.
Some clients ask that we specify more rounds of changes, usually because they know their client’s approval process
and they want to make sure that will be covered, and we will adjust our estimate to whatever your needs may be.

How do you calculate usage fees in your rights-managed work?

Usage fees are based on a number of factors, including the market size, print run,
importance of the work in a client’s campaign, the types of media the work will be used in, etc. Working directly with art buyers makes
the process easier as they will know their clients better than we do.

How long will it take?

This question is often asked along with ” What’s it going to cost?”. Projects vary; no two are exactly alike.
We estimate our time based on long experience but also on the particular requirements of a new project being discussed.
We will ask some questions to help form a clear idea of what will be involved: what the client’s schedule is, how many possible revisions might be needed, what the usage is for the deliverable and, importantly, what the approval process is on their client side. Mapping out this information early on is essential and avoids problems.

What is your print illustration work process?

Our work process for print is pretty standard.
Please note that some steps may not be needed or skipped due to budget or time constraints.

1.   Receive an approved estimate and complete the contract process.
2.   Kickoff the project with the client.
3.   Gather research and reference.
4.   Create rough sketches and/or color comps of key elements to establish the “look and feel”.
5.   Receive Feedback on the sketches and revise as needed.
6.   Once the sketches are approved, begin 3D modeling.
7.   Build colors and textures for the 3D models.
8.   Surface the 3D models and create the required scenes.
9.   Render out elements as needed for compositing.
10. Composite the elements in Photoshop. Color correct, retouch and build the high res illustration.
11. Receive Feedback and create the final high res illustration.
12. Output the illustration at and deliver via ftp.

What is your animation work process?

Animation workflow:
Please note that some steps may not be needed, supplied by the client or skipped due to budget or time constraints.

1.   Receive an approved estimate and complete the contract process.
2.   Kickoff the project with the client.
3.   Gather research and reference.
4.   Create rough sketches and color comps of key elements as needed to establish the “look and feel”.
5.   Receive an approved script from the client.
6.   Create a shot list with time estimates for each shot.
7.   Create a rough storyboard if needed.
8.   Record a rough “scratch” voiceover.
9.   Receive Feedback on the storyboard and revise if needed.
10. Create a tight color storyboard if needed.
11. Search for and edit stock music and sound effects.
12. Create an animatic, or, ” story reel”.This will pin down any slow, fast or awkward
sections early on.
13. Once the animatic is approved, search for voiceover talent if needed.
14. Record and edit the voiceover.
15. Gather existing 3D models and build or buy any additional 3D models required.
16. Build textures for the 3D models.
17. Set up the required 3D scenes.
18. Create the animation and effects for each scene and render out low res sequential images.
19. Composite the scenes in After Effects and render out low res sequences.
20. Replace the animatic visuals with the low res scene sequences and render out a low res first cut video.
21. Receive Feedback on the low res first cut video.
22. Revise as needed and render out a low or medium res second cut video.
23. Revise as needed and render out a high res video.
24. Revise as needed and render out a final cut video.
25. Output the final movies at required sizes and data rates and deliver via ftp.

What software and hardware do you use?

We use the Adobe CC Creative Suite on subscription to keep our software current, and have that installed on PCs as well as Macs. Photoshop, Illustrator, After Effects and Premiere are used the most. Our 3D animation is currently built on powerful HP and Dell workstations using Z Brush and Lightwave 2015.

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